Rose Sales

Thank you for supporting Wyck! Your rose purchase supports Wyck’s operations and its efforts to preserve its many unique treasures, including the oldest rose garden in the United States still growing in its original plan.

Please note: All of the roses offered for sale through Wyck are established on their own rootstock (not grafted). Because of this, many of these roses will eventually colonize, with some displaying this tendency more readily than others. Each rose’s eagerness to spread has been noted in its description so gardeners may use discretion in their site selection. Unless otherwise noted, all varieties bloom once and are available in gallon-sized containers.

You will find the roses offered here are quite easy to care for. These plants require minimal maintenance beyond the regular seasonal tasks required in one’s garden and are generally pest and disease tolerant.

Roses can be picked up curbside after purchase Monday-Friday by appointment. Please contact Lauren Kope at lkope@wyck.org to schedule pickup or if you have any further questions.

Lafayette
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Hardiness: 6b-9b
Height: 3’-5’
Fragrant: Yes
Colonizing: Readily
Description and History: A rare rose, ‘Lafayette’ is available only through Wyck and is believed to have been planted to commemorate the visit of Marquis de Lafayette to Wyck in 1825. A hybrid of Damask and Gallica, this rose produces a fragrant, pom-pom flower colored a deep pinkish plum.

Painted Leda
Hardiness: 4b-9b
Fragrant: Yes
Height: 3’-5’
Colonizing: Moderately
Description and History: Named by Graham Thomas, this is a rose of great antiquity. Early European settlers brought this rose to America with them, where it is often found naturalized at colonial sites in the mid-Atlantic. Buds are held tightly and tinged a dark pink. As the petals unfurl, the flower’s center is revealed a milky white while the edges persist a dappled pink.

Painted Leda

Tuscany
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Hardiness: 4-8
Fragrant: Yes
Height: 3’-5’
Colonizing: Readily
Description and History: A rose to get lost in; the intense velvet petals of this bloom are complimented beautifully by yellow stamens which peek out from its center. Introduced in 1598.

Double Cinnamon Rose (Rosa cinnamonea var. plena)
Hardiness: 6-8
Fragrant: No
Height: 4’-6’
Colonizing: Readily
Description and History: Introduced in 1596, this plant produces adorable puckered blooms abundantly in May, though it is also valuable for its stately cinnamon-colored canes and feathered foliage that embraces each bloom.

Double Cinnamon

Celsiana
Hardiness: 4b-9b
Fragrant: Yes
Height: 3’-6’
Colonizing: Slowly
Description and History: A rose with deep roots in the local area, ‘Celsiana’ has been growing in Germantown since about 1750. It went by the local name Germantown Damask, and was also known as the Tobacco Rose because its fragrant petals were added medicinally to tobacco. A plant of airy habit, this rose bears single blooms with blousy blush pink petals.

Celsiana

Elegant Gallica
Hardiness: 4b-8b
Fragrant: Yes
Height: 3’-4’
Colonizing: Readily
Description and History: ‘Elegant Gallica’ was uncovered and identified by rosarian Leonie Bell in Wyck’s Rose Garden in 1972. Reverend Douglas Seidel who assisted Bell in surveying the garden describes finding the rose: “Then there was that Gallica, a perfectly double rose of a rich, non-fading pink, redolent with the perfume of attar and honey.” All plants of this name currently in the trade today are descendants of this rose discovered by Bell at Wyck.

Elegant Gallica

Tausendschön
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Quart size only. Please note that these plants are small but are budding. They will take a few seasons to climb.
Hardiness: 6b-9b
Fragrant: Yes
Height: 8’-12’
Bloom frequency: Remontant
Colonizing: Slowly
Description and History: Nearly thornless, this gorgeous well-behaved climbing rose was planted by Jane Bowne Haines II next to the front door of the home in the 1900’s. Tausendschön means ‘Thousand Beauties’ and this rose lives up to its name when draped in its ruffled blooms with splotchy pink coloring. Introduced in 1906.

Mystery Roses
These roses were transplanted as part of the boxwood restoration project last fall, but the variety of the rose was not noted. Because we are unsure of the variety, these roses are being offered at a reduced price.

Mystery Roses

Rosa glauca
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Hardiness: 2b-9b
Fragrant: Yes
Height: 4’-9’
Colonizing: Slowly
Description and History: A vase-shaped suckering shrub originating from mountain areas in central and southern Europe. Prized in garden settings for its attractive bluish-purple foliage, hot pink single flowers, and bright orange hips which persist well into winter.

Chloris
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Hardiness: 3b-9b
Fragrant: Yes
Height: 4’-7’
Colonizing: Slowly
Description and History: A thornless rose, this plant produces graceful arching canes that look similar to red twig dogwood in the winter months. In late May, clean light pink blooms cascade along the stems.