Join the Young Friends of Wyck

Join a group of young professionals interested in history, preservation, and building community in Germantown and beyond!

Friends enjoy a garden fresh salad in front of the coach house and apiary after Home Farm Club, summer 2020.

Become a Young Friend of Wyck now!

Membership for the Young Friends of Wyck is pay-your-age $21 – $49 annually. When you purchase a membership you will receive exclusive invites to events, discounts on Wyck programs and merch, and the opportunity to join the advisory board. Please contact Wyck’s Director of Interpretation and Public Outreach with any questions, tfrydman@wyck.org. We look forward to meeting you!

Join a Community of Passionate Young Preservationists

The 2021 season will bring Young Friends of Wyck together for a variety of programs and events. From Celebrate the Roses in spring to the Honey Fest in the fall, with workshops, after hour picnics, and film screenings between the two, there will be plenty that you won’t want to miss out on! For example:

October 2020 – Twilight Tipple

Join us for our outdoor kick-off event Friday, October 23rd from 6-8pm with games, cocktails, and cider. Get your free ticket here.

May 2021 – Rosé and Roses

July 2021 – Film screening on the front lawn

September 2021 – Honey Fest after hours event

Join us for our outdoor kick-off event Friday, October 23rd from 6-8pm with games, cocktails, and cider. Get your free ticket here.

Want to help plan these events? Submit an application here to join the Young Friends of Wyck Advisory Board! No background in history or preservation necessary!

In 2019, Wyck replaced the historic boxwood edging in the rose garden.

Support Wyck Projects

The Young Friends of Wyck events support preservation and community outreach efforts. Help us on projects such as adding welcoming signage to the Germantown fence or conserving important artifacts such as the Germantown Brewery sign that hung on the avenue at the turn of the 19th century.

The oldest rose garden in the United States, still growing in its original plan. Photo courtesy of Robert Buzzard.