July 1, 2016 Update

THIS WEEK’S HARVEST (July 1, from 2-6 pm):

Black Raspberries
Black Raspberries

Arugula $2.50/bag
Beets $2.50/bunch
*Black Raspberries $4.00/pint
Blueberries (limited quantity) $2.50/half pint
Broccoli Greens $2.50/bunch
Carrots $2.50/bunch
Collard Greens $2.50/bunch
Cucumbers $2.00/lb
Eggs $3.00/half dozen
Garlic Scapes $2.00/bunch
Frisee Endive $2.50/head
Italiko Rosso (Chicory Greens) $2.50/bunch
Kale (assorted varieties) $2.50/bunch
Lettuce $2.00/head
Salad mix $2.50/bag
Spring Onions $1.00/each
*String Beans (limited quantity) $4.00/pint
Summer Squash $1.50/lb
Swiss Chard $2.50/bunch

Herbs $1.50/bunch (may include *basil, *cilantro, sage, oregano, thyme, lavender, mint, chives, etc.)
Raw Honey from the bees on the property $14 for a 12 oz. jar
Flower Bouquets – $5.00

*NEW ARRIVALS THIS WEEK


Eating With the Season

cilantroEating with the season is all about keeping in touch with the bounty. There are weeks when I harvest a lot of one or two crops. This indicates to me that the crop is at the peak of its production, which also means that it is the best time to be eating that produce. As mindful locavores, I think it shows respect as we embrace these edible gifts. When I encounter weeks such as these, I will share that information with you and give you recipes to work with that particular vegetable and or herb.

This week, I have harvested a lot of summer squash. I will also have quite a bit of cilantro, and I would like to introduce working with broccoli greens. These greens can be used like other hardy, leafy greens (kale, collards) and have a mild brocolli flavor with a bit of bitterness.

I also want to share with you that you will have the opportunity to meet our Executive Director – Jennifer – during the next couple markets. I will be temporarily away. Jennifer has brought a wonderful new energy to Wyck, and I’m sure you’ll quickly recognize and appreciate her warm smile and good vibe.

your farmer,
Kripa


RECIPES:

TUBETTI RIGATE WITH LONG COOKED BROCCOLI LEAVES AND PECORINO

SUMMER SQUASH SALAD WITH LEMON CITRONETTE

CILANTRO CHICKEN


A Little Something Else

Blueberries
By James Lasdun

I’m talking to you old man.

Listen to me as you step inside this garden

to fill a breakfast bowl with blueberries

ripened on the bushes I’m planting now,

twenty years back from where you’re standing.

It’s strictly a long-term project—first year

pull off the blossoms before they open,

second year let them flower, watch the bees

bobbing in every bonnet,

but don’t touch the fruit till year three,

and then only sample a handful or two . . .

Old man I’m doing this for you!

You know what they say about blueberries:

blood-cleansing, mood-lifting memory-boosters;

every bush a little fountain of youth

sparkling with flavonoids, anthocyanin . . .

I’ve spent all summer clearing brush

sawing locust poles for the frames,

digging in mounds of pine needles, bales of peat moss—

I thought I’d do it while I still could.

You can do something for me in turn:

think about the things an old man should;

things I’ve shied away from, last things.

Care about them only don’t care too

(you’ll know better than I do what I mean

or what I couldn’t say, but meant).

Reconcile, forgive, repent,

but don’t go soft on me; keep the faith,

our infidels’ implicit vow:

“not the hereafter but the here and now . . . ”

Weigh your heart against the feather of truth

as the Egyptians did, and purge its sin,

but for your own sake, not your soul’s.

And since the only certain

eternity’s the one that stretches backward,

look for it here inside this garden:

Blueray, Bluecrop, Bluetta, Hardy Blue;

little fat droplets of transubstantiate sky,

each in its yeast-misted wineskin, chilled in dew.

This was your labor, these are the fruits thereof.

Fill up your bowl old man and bring them in.

June 24, 2016 Update

THIS WEEK’S HARVEST (June 24, from 2-6 pm):

Chicoree_frisee
Frisee Endive

Arugula $2.50/bag
*Beets $2.50/bunch
Blueberries (limited quantity) $2.50/half pint
Broccoli $3.00/bunch
Broccoli Greens $2.50/bunch
*Carrots $2.50/bunch
Collard Greens $2.50/bunch
*Cucumbers $2.00/lb
Eggs $3.00/half dozen
Garlic Scapes $2.00/bunch
*Frisee Endive $2.50/head
*Italiko Rosso (Chicory Greens) $2.50/bunch
Kale (assorted varieties) $2.50/bunch
Kale Mix $2.50/bag
Lettuce $2.00/head
Salad mix $2.50/bag
Spring Onions $1.00/each
Sugar Snap Peas $2.50/pint
*Summer Squash $1.50/lb
Swiss Chard $2.50/bunch

Herbs $1.50/bunch (may include *basil, *cilantro, sage, oregano, thyme, lavender, mint, chives, etc.)
Raw Honey from the bees on the property $14 for a 12 oz. jar
Flower Bouquets – $5.00/small $10.00/large

*NEW ARRIVALS THIS WEEK

Lingering Goodness

Cichorium_endiva
Chicory Greens

These past two weeks have been very busy. I was not able to spend time at the farm on the weekend, which meant that I was coming to work in the evenings after my other job. Spending the evening on the farm feels special. As the sun retreats, it feels as though the earth is getting ready to prepare for the cool and the dark time of the cycle. It almost feels like it is embracing and taking in all the crops, the millions of creatures, and cradling them to a restful state. I can sense my own mood being that of quiet reflection, rather than the energized and busy mood I feel in the early mornings. The birds seem to be chirping louder, before the total silence of the night and the bees are seen leaving the flowers and heading to the hives. I am always alone at the farm in the evenings, and the quiet acknowledgement of all of the plants of my presence and my appreciation of theirs feels like a sweet secret. This feeling of a quiet turning in lingers with me as I get into bed.

I have therefore been thinking about the idea of ‘lingering’ – feelings that linger, tastes that linger, sensations that linger. And one of the tastes that I find most interesting is a bitter taste, that lingers, but only for ever so short a moment (just to request your acknowledgment of it) and then, is gone. That surprise, I find special. This week, I will have a couple greens that will do that for you – the Frisee and the Italiko Rosso. They both belong to the Chicorium genus, with a botanical distinction, in that the chicories form a head, while endives are low growing, with curly leaves. The Frisee, is therefore an Endive, and the Belgian Endive is a chicory – despite its name.

Both these will be laced with a taste of an icy-sweet bitterness, which serves really well with contrasting sweet, savory and salty flavors. You can eat them raw or cooked – the outer leaves tend to be more bitter than the hearts.
I hope that you get to try them this week.

your farmer,
Kripa

Recipes

ROASTED BEET, FRISEE SALAD WITH MISO-SESAME DRESSING

LYONAISE- THE CLASSIC FRENCH SALAD

FRISEE AND APPLE SALAD WITH HERB CRUSTED GOAT CHEESE MEDALLIONS

 

A Little Something Else

[under the evening moon]

By Kobayashi Issa

Translated by Robert Haas

 

Under the evening moon

the snail

is stripped to the waist.

 


 

The World in the Evening

 

By Rachel Sherwood

 

As this suburban summer wanders toward dark

cats watch from their driveways — they are bored

and await miracles. The houses show, through windows

flashes of knife and fork, the blue light

of televisions, inconsequential fights

between wife and husband in the guest bathroom

 

voices sound like echoes in these streets

the chattering of awful boys as they plot

behind the juniper and ivy, miniature guerillas

that mimic the ancient news of the world

and shout threats, piped high across mock fences

to girls riding by in the last pieces of light

 

the color of the sky makes brilliant reflection

in the water and oil along the curb

deepened aqua and the sharp pure rose of the clouds

there is no sun or moon, few stars wheel

above the domestic scene — this half-lit world

still, quiet calming the dogs worried by distant alarms

 

there — a woman in a window washes a glass

a man across the street laughs through an open door

utterly alien, alone. There is a time, seconds between

the last light and the dark stretch ahead, when color

is lost — the girl on her swing becomes a swift

apparition, black and white flowing suddenly into night.

June 17, 2016 Update

THIS WEEK’S HARVEST (June 17, from 2-6 pm)

unnamedArugula $2.50/bag
Blueberries (limited quantity) $2.50/half pint
Broccoli $3.00/bunch
Collard Greens $2.50/bunch
Eggs $3.00/half dozen
Garlic Scapes $2.00/bunch
Kale (assorted varieties) $2.50/bunch
Kale Mix $2.50/bag
Lettuce $2.00/head
Radishes $2.00/bunch
Radish Greens $2.00/bunch
Salad mix $2.50/bag
Spring Onions $1.00/each
Strawberries (limited quantity) $3.50/pint
Sugar Snap Peas $2.50/pint
Summer Squash $1.50/lb
Swiss Chard $2.50/bunch
Tart Cherries (limited quantity) $3.50/pint

Herbs $1.50/bunch (may include sage, oregano, thyme, lavender, mint, chives, etc.)
Raw Honey from the bees on the property $14 for a 12 oz. jar
Flower Bouquets – $5.00/small $10.00/large

Summer Squash Madness!

This week brings exciting new-comers to the table. I will have onions, summer squash, swiss chard, blueberries and tart cherries. The summer squash has taken off this week. I was going about my field walk when the summer squash caught my attention – it seems like it has doubled in size over the last couple days (not exaggerating!). I harvested one medium sized zucchini on Tuesday (as I write this), but there are several baby ones that are coming along so rapidly that I am pretty sure that I will have a fair sized bounty to sell.

Someone asked me a while back “what are you most looking forward to as a farmer?” I started to talk about the specific veggies that I like – the basil, tomatoes, sweet peppers… but I am thinking of a different answer today – what I most look forward to is watching the crops grow, put out blossoms, those blossoms inviting pollinators and making delicious fruit! THIS IS what I look forward to most… it is amazing and while I watch this closely and daily, I still look forward to it every season.

(in awe) your farmer,

Kripa

RECIPES:

Swiss_Chard_RainbowGarlicky Swiss Chard

Ingredients:

2 bunches Swiss chard, stems removed

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 garlic cloves OR SCAPES minced

Large pinch crushed red pepper flakes

Salt

Preparation:

Stack chard leaves on top of one another (you can make several piles) and slice them into 1/4-inch strips.

Heat oil in a very large skillet (or use a soup pot). Add garlic and red pepper flakes and sauté for 30 seconds, until garlic is fragrant. Stir in the chard, coating it in oil. Cover pan and let cook for about 2 minutes, until chard is wilted. Uncover, stir and cook for 2 minutes longer. Season with salt.


 

Cucurbita_zephyr_summer_squashHerbed Summer Squash

Ingredients:

1.5 lb. Summer Squash

Half cup chicken/vegetable broth

2 sprigs Thyme

Salt to taste

Preparation:

Sautee 1 1/2 pounds diced yellow squash in butter over medium-high heat, 1 minute. Add 1/2 cup broth, 2 sprigs thyme, and salt to taste; bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to medium low; partially cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 8 minutes. Uncover; cook 2 more minutes. Stir in chopped parsley and salt and pepper to taste.


 

A Little Something Else

by Lin Manuel Miranda

 

…We chase the melodies that seem to find us

Until they’re finished songs and start to play

When senseless acts of tragedy remind us

That nothing here is promised, not one day

This show is proof that history remembers

We live through times when hate and fear seem stronger

We rise and fall and light from dying embers

Remembrances that hope and love lasts long

And love is love is love is love is love is love is love is love is love

Cannot be killed or swept aside,

Now fill the world with music love and pride

 

June 10, 2016 Update

THIS WEEK’S HARVEST (June 10 from 2-6pm):Lettuce growing in a row

Arugula $2.50/bag
Broccoli $3.00/bunch
Collard Greens $2.50/bunch
Eggs $3.00/half dozen
Garlic Scapes $2.00/bunch
Kale (assorted varieties $2.50/bunch
Kale Mix $2.50/bag
Lettuce $2.00/head
Mustard Greens $2.50/bunch
Radishes $2.00/bunch
Radish Greens $2.00/bunch
Salad mix $2.50/bag
Strawberries (limited quantity) $3.50/pint
Sugar Snap Peas $2.50/pint

Herbs $1.50/bunch (may include sage, oregano, thyme, lavender, mint, chives, etc.)
Raw Honey from the bees on the property $14 for a 12 oz. jar

 

Don’t toss those radish greens!

Most of the veggies we eat have greens that are perfectly edible (and even healthier than it’s fruit). Some examples are: Broccoli, Peas, Beets, Radish, Turnips…
This season the radishes have made the most gorgeous and hearty green tops. I think it is due to the hot weather we have had. The heat encourages the plant to put energy towards the leaves and the flower versus the root. This season I invite you to embrace radish greens – and if you are moved to, you may literally as well.

Radish greens are chock full of nutrition, in fact the greens are the more nutritious portion of the plant. Radish greens are very rich in calcium with 200mg (20% RDA) of calcium in just a 3 ounce, 44 calorie serving. It also provides protein, iron and vitamins A and C. All greens are naturally a rich source of vitamin K and magnesium as well as other vitamins and minerals.
When you bring the radishes home, separate the greens from the roots – so that the root does not continue to draw out nutrition from the greens (which will cause them to wilt quickly). Store the greens like you would any of your other greens. The roots can be stored in a bag in the fridge until ready for use.

You may use the greens in your smoothie, throw them in a soup, layer a leaf in your sandwich, make a pesto, add them to your stir fry, or sauté them with garlic and then add them to your sandwich – the options are several. I hope you have a chance to try them and perhaps this will be an addition to your favorite vegetable list.

your farmer,
KripaFarm June 10 2016 - 2

 

RECIPES:

Spicy Stir Fried Greens:

Ingredients:
8-10 ounces radish greens and/or swiss chard, washed and cut into 1/2 inch slices
2-3 tsp. peanut oil
2 large garlic cloves

Sauce Ingredients:
1 T soy sauce
1 tsp. rice vinegar
1 tsp. Agave nectar
1/4 tsp. (or less) Sriracha sauce or other hot sauce

Instructions:
Wash and dry radish greens . You may also soak the greens for about 30 minutes in very cold water. (This makes sure they’re crisp for the quick stir-frying.) Working in batches, cut greens crosswise into 1/2 inch slices.

Mix together sauce ingredients and set aside. Preheat the wok or large, heavy frying pan until it feels very hot when you hold your hand there, then add the oil. When oil looks shimmery, add the garlic cloves and cook about 30 seconds, making sure garlic doesn’t start to brown. Remove garlic and discard.

Add chopped radish greens all at once and immediately begin to stir-fry, turning greens over and over just until they are almost all wilted (1 to 2 minutes). When greens are almost all wilted, add sauce ingredients, stir, and cook 30 seconds more. Serve hot.

Radish Leaves and Avocado Quiches
yields 15 mini quiches (5 cm in diameters)

Ingredients:
15 store-bought mini quiche shells
1 + 1 tablespoons of butter
1 shallot, finely diced
1 big handful of radish leaves, rinsed well, dried, chopped
1/2 tsp mustard flesh from a whole avocado, diced, mixed with a bit of lemon juice 1 egg 1 – 2 tablespoon(s) grate pecorino cheese (good match with radish) a dash of milk/ cream about 6 red radishes, thinly sliced good pinch of salt Pepper to taste
Instructions:
Pre-heat oven to 350F
Pre-heat a skillet, saute the shallot and butter over very low heat for about 1 minute. Increase the heat, add radish leaves and salt and stir for another 30 seconds. Discard any juice, set the leaves aside.
Puree avocado and the cooked greens. Add the egg, cheese, mustard, milk/cream, salt and pepper and mix thoroughly. Spoon the filling into the shells, arrange radish slices on top, dot with tiny butter cubes and a bit of salt on radish. Bake until the top slightly firm to touch, about 20 minutes.
Serve warm.

 

A Little Something Else….

“Market Day”

We have traveled all this way
to see the real France:
these trays of apricots and grapes spilled out
like semi-precious stones
for us to choose; a milky wayFarm June 10 2016 - 3
of cheeses whose name like planets
I forget; heraldic sole
displayed on ice, as if the fish
themselves had just escaped,
leaving their scaled armor behind.
There’s nothing like this
anywhere, you say. And I see
Burnside Avenue in the Bronx, my mother

sending me for farmer cheese and lox:
the rounds of cheese grainy and white, pocked
like the surface of the moon;
the silken slices of smoked fish
lying in careful pleats; and always,
as here, sawdust under our feet
the color of sand brought in on our pants cuffs
from Sunday at the beach.
Across the street on benches,
my grandparents lifted their faces
to the sun the way the blind turn
towards a familiar sound, speaking
another language I almost understand.

Farmer’s Market Returns! – June 3 Harvest List

Wyck Farm

Welcome to the season of fresh food!

The start of the growing season is such an exciting time of year – to plan and to seed, to bear witness as the field comes alive, and now to begin the spring harvest! As my farmer-ly duty I should mention the weather, which, so far has been robust – with all the rain and the recent heat. The plants are probably filled with surprise and a little bit of worry, (as am I) but we are all hoping to put forth an abundant season. I already have all the rows sown with crops – beets and carrots, peas, tomatoes, cucumbers, potatoes and onions, greens, okra, sweet potatoes – to name some. I also hope the berry bushes will produce well. This work is beautiful work – to watch the field get productive and lush. Also, Wyck is a beautiful site, and I am lucky to work the ground there. I hope that while you all stop by for produce, you will take a stroll on to the grounds, see the field and the flower garden, visit the chickens and the bees.

Some of you may remember me from last season. I was the interim farm manager while Katie was on maternity leave. Katie decided to leave Wyck this past winter but she is still growing food (no surprise there!) and you can follow her on her blog/website twofeetinthedirt.com. Also, on Katie’s behalf I convey her good wishes to you and relay that she will miss seeing you all at market.

I would like to introduce Kate Illes, who is joining Wyck as the assistant gardener and farmer this season. I am sure that you will have a chance to meet her warm personality at market someday. It is wonderful having her be part of the team.

For my part, I am delighted to be back at Wyck for another season! Wendell Berry says “Eating is an agricultural act”. I look forward to joining you all in performing this good and hard work together.

This Week’s Harvest List:
Arugula $2.50/bag
Bok Choi $2.00/head
Eggs $3.00/half dozen
Kale Mix $2.50/bag
Lettuce $2.00/head
Mustard Greens $2.50/bunch
Radishes $2.00/bunch
Salad mix $2.50/bag
Strawberries (limited quantity) $3.50/pint

Herbs $1.50/bunch (may include sage, oregano, thyme, lavender, mint, chives, etc.)
Raw Honey from the bees on the property $14 for a 12 oz. jar