Summer Update – Longwood/Wyck Collaboration

As the hot days of summer begin to descend upon us and the rose season largely came and went, I find that days in the garden are very different from from earlier in the season, but no less beautiful and gratifying. Pruning of the rose beds has begun; the appearance will be changing a bit from what we have seen in previous seasons. In an effort to give the beds a more manicured and managed look, roses will be more clearly separated by species, pruned back harder to create more sturdy shapes, and labels made more clear and abundant. I am very excited about the changes we will see in subsequent seasons, and hope our guests will be, too! Here is a look at two of our later season bloomers, both climbers and arranged in beautiful fountain formations in the center parterre where our historic magnolia stands.

Rosa setigera, an aggressive but lovely climbing rose.
Rosa palustris ‘Scandens,’ a cultivar of the Swamp Rose.
Rosa setigera, an aggressive but lovely climbing rose.
Rosa setigera, an aggressive but lovely climbing rose.

Though we have reached the end of the road this season for many of our rosey blooms, the heat of summer is beginning to usher in the flowers of many of our other perennials and shrubs. Here is a sampling of what is currently in bloom.

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Aesculus parviflora, the bottlebrush buckeye, and its attractive, abundant blooms.
A closer view of the elegant spire of Aesculus flowers.
A closer view of the elegant spire of Aesculus flowers.
Acanthus spinosis, also known as Spiny Bear's Breeches, one of my all time favorite perennials.
Acanthus spinosis, also known as Spiny Bear’s Breeches, one of my all time favorite perennials.
Lychnis coronaria, or rose campion.
Lychnis coronaria, or rose campion, and its fuzzy leaves and stems.
An unfortunately blurry image of Larkspur, abundant in our beds.
An unfortunately blurry image of Larkspur, abundant in our beds.
Large, lovely flower heads on our Hydrangeas.
Large, lovely flower heads on our Hydrangeas.
Our native Geranium maculatum.
Our native Geranium maculatum.
A lovely lily.
A lovely lily.
More lilies!
More lilies!

In other exciting news, and as the subject line suggests, we have a fabulous collaboration underway with the Longwood Graduate Fellows Professional Outreach Program (POP) of Longwood Gardens. This summer, Wyck was selected as the site for the graduate students’ summer POP, and how grateful and excited we are. The fellows will be redesigning signage on the property, redesigning and installing new mixed rose and perennial beds on the perimeter of the rose garden along the fence line, and helping to strategize fundraising and grant opportunities. The fellows are so talented and bright, interested and interesting,  and I am thrilled to have them with us! More updates to come!

Next Saturday, July 12, is our Community and History Festival from 12-4 featuring local music and food, free house and garden tours, and talks from local experts on ornithology and the history of women in Philadelphia horticulture. Come out and join us for some fun!

-Denise